Welcome to eWhite House Watch
Where Technology, Privacy, and Politics Collide

Cyber Policy Updates Written By La...

Cyber Policy Updates Written By Law Students

eWhite House Watch features concise updates on cyber policy issued by the Office of the President of the United States (POTUS). Monitored and written primarily by law students, each eWHW cyber policy update is presented in an easy-to-scan format that includes links to POTUS announcements, federal and state proposed legislation, breaking news, updates, cyber policy committee reports, and more.

Technology + Privacy + Politics

Technology + Privacy + Politics

Striking the proper balance of benefits between technological advances and privacy protection has always posed challenges. Today, the challenges are even greater as technology significantly outpaces privacy protections; and the need for greater recognition of this reality and honest public discourse is more pressing than ever. eWhite House Watch monitors the cyber agenda so you can be informed and partake in the debate.

New to the Cyber World?

New to the Cyber World?

Visit our special feature, Origins: The White House Cyber Agenda for details on the current administration's Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative. Learn More

Companion Blog: eLessons Learned

Companion Blog: eLessons Learned

The creator of eWhite House Watch also created eLessons Learned with a similar vision in mind: To provide readers with useful and timely information about how technology impacts our legal system and our lives in a way that is easy to understand. Learn More



Sony Hacking – A Matter of U.S. National Security? You Betcha.

What may have first appeared to most to be of the type of data breach we’ve grown accustomed to hearing about, this one’s different – or is it? While much of the early media attention to the Sony hacking story morphed into salacious coverage of the details of embarrassing emails and the inner workings of Hollywood, the coverage is shifting back to the undeniable national security implications that this incident exposed.  As we’ve covered in previous posts and feature articles, there is an underlying theme of national security that each private industry data breach touches on U.S. economic survival.   As has been reported, the United States is now seeking China's help "to cripple" North Korean cyber offensive capabilities. The New York Times reported this morning that U.S. preparedness for an incident such as this may not be as one may think.  A must-read, the NYT story describes the Sony hack as “the first major, state-sponsored destructive computer-network attacks on American soil.” The story continues by identifying the many difficulties facing a U.S. “proportional response.” Included is the “concern over the risk of escalation with North Korea, since the United States has far more vulnerable targets, from its power grid to its financial markets, than North Korea.”   While the Obama Administration and the Department of Defense have taken steps to build a stable cyber defense mechanism (see Naval Academy Cyber Security CenterUS Cyber Command, etc.), these defense mechanisms have yet to be integrated in any meaningful way with private industry. The Administration blames the attack on North Korea, but North Korea denies any wrongdoing, even going as far as proclaiming its interest in helping the United States get to the bottom of what happened and help find the perpetrators.

CIA Controversy Underscores Reality of Insider Threats

Following concerns raised by Sen. Diane Feinstein in March 2014, the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) recently admitted to hacking a computer network used by the Senate Intelligence Committee

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A New Kind of Attack

Five Chinese military hackers who were officers in Unit 61398 of the Third Department of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army were indicted by a grand jury in the Western District of Pennsylvania on charges of computer hacking, economic espionage, and other offenses directed at six American victim entities. This case marks the first time

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Malware Crackdown

Over the past two months, the FBI has cracked down on multiple fraud scams and Internet malware programs.   In late April 2014, the FBI brought to our attention that retailers in nine states across the country had been affected by a group of Nigerian criminals

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What Is a Jerk, Exactly? More Important, Why Does the FTC Care and What Does the Internet of Things Have to Do With All of This Attention?

Fernando M. Pinguelo and Sarah Austin   For starters, merriam-webster.com defines “jerk” as "a stupid person or [one] not well-liked or who treats other[s] . . . badly."

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Section 215 Bulk Telephony Metadata Collection Program: Is the end in sight?

By Schawn-Paul Rotella   Earlier this year President Obama announced his intention to end the government's Bulk Telephony Metadata Collection Program. In its stead, the program will have the government’s responsibilities handed over to the telephone companies that operate inside of the United States. Here is how Section 215

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